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Author Topic: Blu-ray to DCP  (Read 47217 times)

billyjames

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Blu-ray to DCP
« on: September 19, 2011, 11:18:26 PM »
I'm curious if anyone has any experience in converting from a Blu-ray disk to a DCP package.

Terrence Meiczinger

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #1 on: September 20, 2011, 09:46:52 PM »
There isn't a one-step process. You'd have to rip the blu-ray to something like H.264, then demux that to TIFF/WAV, and the create the DCP from that.

jonathanj

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #2 on: September 21, 2011, 06:32:39 AM »
Most Blu-rays today is H.264, so in theory it should be possible to demux directly from the BD's video M2TS file to TIFF/WAV using FFMPEG.
I can't see why it should be more complicated than converting a mp4/mpg/avi file to a DCP.

The audio might be a problem though... I don't know how you demux e.g. 'DTS-HD Master Audio', but I'm sure there is a tool out there somewhere.

cinemaxav

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #3 on: September 27, 2011, 04:40:58 AM »
Bit of a late bumpb, but providing the BD is unencrypted, you can extract the h264 video using ffmpeg.
Better still, you can do that direct to TIFF frames.

I'm playing around with it, and it's great, although my challenge now is being able to read the right channel on stereoscopic BDs, and not had much luck due to limited implementation of the MVC codec...

for extracting frames, you can do this:
Code: [Select]
ffmpeg -i xxxxx.m2ts -f image2 y%06.tif
xxxxx.m2ts is obviously the source file. y%06.tif is create a file starting with letter y then have sequential numbers, padded out to 6 digits long - in this case, "y000001.tif", "y000002.tif", and so on. For example, "abc-%03.tif" will give you files "abc-001.tif", "abc-002.tif", etc.

Also, I've found that whilst I can't actually view the TIFF files generated this way (I think the TIFF header might be missing or something), OpenDCP JPEG2000 compressor can read them fine and compress without any issues :)

jonathanj

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #4 on: September 27, 2011, 09:31:15 AM »
for extracting frames, you can do this:
Code: [Select]
ffmpeg -i xxxxx.m2ts -f image2 y%06.tif
xxxxx.m2ts is obviously the source file. y%06.tif is create a file starting with letter y then have sequential numbers, padded out to 6 digits long - in this case, "y000001.tif", "y000002.tif", and so on. For example, "abc-%03.tif" will give you files "abc-001.tif", "abc-002.tif", etc.

Also, I've found that whilst I can't actually view the TIFF files generated this way (I think the TIFF header might be missing or something), OpenDCP JPEG2000 compressor can read them fine and compress without any issues :)

Bluray h264 material (and many other formats) is yuv420p according to FFMPEG.
Code: [Select]
Stream #0.0[0x1011]: Video: h264, yuv420p,
So when demuxing a BD to TIFF, you get TIFF's with the Colour model 'YCbCr', not RGB.
That's why you can't view the files unless you have something like Xnview installed (it internally converts the image to RGB to show it on screen).
Before v0.20, OpenDCP did not support YUV/YCBCR TIFFs and you had to invoke -pix_fmt rgb24 when extracting frames from a YUV/YCBCR source in order to force FFMPEG to make the images RGB.
« Last Edit: September 29, 2011, 04:36:09 PM by jonathanj »

cinemaxav

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #5 on: September 29, 2011, 04:10:11 PM »
Thanks for the clarification, John, it makes perfect sense ;)

billyjames

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #6 on: October 23, 2011, 05:13:42 PM »
Since my original post on this, I had some success with this. I used a blu-ray ripper to get a quicktime file. I've been using CineAsset for the conversion to DCP which works pretty well. Occasionally there are some color variation though. In one case, I was able to extract the 5.1 audio with FCP. CineAsset allows for audio dubbing so I was able to dub-in the 5.1 instead of just using stereo. Right now we have three Bluray to DCP conversions playing on a screen (with full film distributor's permission for the conversions).

Each one can be a different process though since not all blu-rays are the same.

Wolfgang Woehl

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #7 on: October 23, 2011, 08:31:51 PM »
Out of curiosity: Why would you want to turn BluRay content into a DCP? I know, it's a strange world. But I really want to know :)

jonathanj

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #8 on: October 26, 2011, 08:18:35 AM »
Wolfgang,

I can't say what Mr. James reason for doing the conversion is, but personally I'd say it's more secure to have a file based format instead of a physical media.
Stability is the word I'm looking for :)

Sometimes the movie or whatever it is, simply doesn't exist on anything other than DVD/BD (short kids movies, documentaries, etc...), and though the audience might not really know the difference, it can be a drag for the projectionist to get the disc to play properly on whatever hardware the cinema might have.

I went to watch a documentary a few years back at a rather big cinema and it was very visible how it was a BluRay they showed.
The word "Play" + icon (triangle) was shown at the very beginning of the movie, and it seemed a bit jerky every now and then, like they played it from an old BD player or the projector didn't understand the 24fps signal.
I know a DCP isn't a wonder format that is perfect for any solution, but it's interesting to see which alternative content one can use it for... not restricted by having a HD+ source.

Lately I've been playing around with conversion of DVD to DCP, simply to compare that image quality to a PC's upscaling (VLC/Media Player Classic).
It's been working very good so far, with a toolchain consisting completely of opensource apps.

Wolfgang Woehl

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2011, 09:59:45 AM »
Thanks Jonathan :)

Coeur Noir

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #10 on: December 02, 2011, 05:25:36 AM »
Quote
it can be a drag for the projectionist to get the disc to play properly on whatever hardware the cinema might have
Oooow yes it is ! Anytime it's possible I do "make" my own DCP rather than dealing with scaler, dma8, and DVD or BD player... This way you have total control over your playlist (automations and so on) which is not so easy with alternative contents (you know, the weird things that are not DCP ;) )...

chr.hove

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #11 on: February 05, 2012, 04:45:30 PM »
I am suffering BIG TIME having to deal with unstable BD players with no automation interface - I would like to know if you can recommend some software for converting BD to DCP?
What are you using?
Quote
Anytime it's possible I do "make" my own DCP rather than dealing with scaler, dma8, and DVD or BD player... This way you have total control over your playlist (automations and so on) which is not so easy with alternative contents (you know, the weird things that are not DCP ;) )...

guarango

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #12 on: February 27, 2012, 06:14:46 PM »
Also, two exhibitors tell me a very good reason:
most cinemas need more expensive hardware equipment in order to use their DLP projectors with a BluRay player attached.

Out of curiosity: Why would you want to turn BluRay content into a DCP? I know, it's a strange world. But I really want to know :)

jonathanj

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #13 on: February 29, 2012, 07:44:52 PM »
Well, it's true that some (if not all) Series 1 projectors didn't support HDCP, which might be what the exhibitors mean.
To work around this, it was/is possible to buy something like the HDFury: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HDfury

Today with series 2 projectors and e.g., a Doremi IMB (Integrated Media Block), you can just plug in a BD player and get crisp picture and full multichannel PCM audio over the HDMI (far from all BD players work nicely in this configuration though...).
The idea is good and is supposed to be "plug'n play", but in reality it's often more "plug'n prey" to be honest.

hdvprojection

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Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2012, 02:12:08 PM »
Out of curiosity: Why would you want to turn BluRay content into a DCP? I know, it's a strange world. But I really want to know :)
Cinema exposition of Blu-ray is awkward at best. If the projectionist is there to press play after the previews have run, then that alone is a minor miracle, but they are almost never there to douse the image before the Blu-ray player splash hits the screen, which sort of kills the cinema effect. It would be one thing if the operators were still conscientious, well-trained and well-compensated professionals, but by and large they are non-union teenagers slinging popcorn. A DCP helps deal with these shortcomings.

I have a question: if I'm dealing (as I am) with an unencrypted festival screener BRD, I have to assume it's easier and safer to work with the m2ts file on my hard drive than on the disc in the removable drive. Is it as simple as drag-n-drop? Or does the m2ts file reference other files around it on the disc? Thanks.

dcinemaforum.com

Re: Blu-ray to DCP
« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2012, 02:12:08 PM »